Thoughts on Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)

Editor’s note: A warm welcome to my friend, Simon Yang. This is his first piece for Review Film Review.

Recently I’ve started to pick some Australian films to watch, and Phillip Noyce’s Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) stood out from a must-see list with its obscure title.

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The Journey Is the Reward: In Transit (2015)

 

For one glorious week, documentarian and pioneer of direct cinema Albert Maysles’s last film, the posthumously released In Transit (2015), was free to watch online. In a fine bit of irony, it was Maysles’s death that threw the film’s distribution into limbo. Co-directed with Lynn True, David Usui, Nelson Walker III, and Benjamin Wu (everyone also shared cinematography duties, except True, who edited), the film boards the Chicago-St. Paul/Minneapolis-Spokane-Portland/Seattle Empire Builder, the busiest cross-country train in the US, in search of passengers’ stories. You think you know where this is going (sorry), and you do—but knowing is one thing, experiencing another.

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Thoughts on Booksmart (2019)

Yet another entry in the genre of teenage coming-of-age films, Booksmart (2019), the debut directorial feature from Olivia Wilde, miraculously manages to stake out new ground. It feels fresh and original, mostly because it does well the postmodern trick of mixing and matching old forms.

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False Prophet: Corpus Christi (Boże Ciało 2019)

Did you know that Poland has a fake priest problem? You’d think parishioners would catch on pretty quickly, but apparently some of these impersonators are sincere in their ministries, lacking only the credentials. What would drive someone to be a sincere fake priest? How might they handle their duties? Corpus Christi (Boże Ciało 2019), a religious high-wire act based on a true story, offers one tantalizing example.

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The Lucky One: Miss Americana (2020, aka Taylor Swift: Miss Americana)

People often say that you need to be objective to be a good critic, but I’ve often found that being invested in a work can illumine more pathways into what it’s trying to do and how well it succeeds. Of course, it’s not necessarily a “better” perspective, whatever that means, just a different one. Being a Swiftie, I find the Taylor Swift on screen in Lana Wilson’s Miss Americana (2020, aka Taylor Swift: Miss Americana) to be a familiar presence from all of the interview and behind-the-scenes footage of her that already exists, some of which is used in this documentary. As Swift suggests in an early interview, also included, fame and career longevity have always been on her mind, and the film grounds such abstract musings in raw and emotionally vulnerable moments, captured as they happen.

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Thoughts on Weathering with You (Tenki no Ko / 天気の子 2019)

Weathering with You (Tenki no Ko / 天気の子 2019), Makoto Shinkai’s new feature, is a strange beast. The trailer conveys it well: stunningly beautiful, but with two plotlines that seem to be on different planes altogether, to the point where the trailer can’t find a way to put them together. Also, the characterizations are lazy archetypes and many points of tension are artificial. I still enjoyed it though.

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The Banality of Evil: Notes on an Appearance (2018)

Notes on an Appearance (2018), writer-director-editor Ricky D’Ambrose’s no-budget feature debut, runs an hour long but feels much longer, in both good ways and bad (the good and bad are mutually constitutive). D’Ambrose has made two shorts before, using them as experiments to prepare for Notes, and the thought and consideration that went into this film shine through.

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A Living Cinematic Fossil: Angel Has Fallen (2019)

You don’t need me to tell you that Angel Has Fallen (2019), directed by Ric Roman Waugh, is pretty damn shitty. The incoherent action sequences (edited by Gabriel Fleming), including one that’s so underlit as to be literally incomprehensible (cinematography by Jules O’Loughlin), is par for the course in today’s action blockbuster (or “blockbuster”) landscape, but you know something’s really wrong when even the dialogue scenes are confusingly shot. Secret Service agent extraordinaire Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) returns for another round of mayhem in this third installment of a franchise whose first installment was already inferior to another film released around the same time and with the same premise, White House Down (2013). I wish Jamie Foxx had gotten the threepeat treatment instead.

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The Flaming Fist of Christ Compels You! The Divine Fury (Saja / 사자 2019)

What if the titular protagonist of Constantine (2005) was a mixed-martial arts fighter? What if he was really, really good? What if he could burn demons with his bare hand? Writer-director Kim Joo-hwan’s The Divine Fury (Saja / 사자 2019) answers these questions we never thought we had.

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Thoughts on My Days of Mercy (2017)

Editor’s note: This piece is part of a series on the 2019 Taiwan International Queer Film Festival.

My Days of Mercy (2017), Tali Shalom-Ezer’s death penalty lesbian rom-com written by Joe Barton, is a strange bird. The basic structure is very similar to Up in the Air (2009), with Ellen Page playing the George Clooney audience surrogate role, and Kate Mara as the Vera Farmiga outsider role. But whereas that film used its downtime to explore the depths of the Clooney character’s loneliness (with the help of Anna Kendrick), here the second focus is a serious, nuanced exploration of the aftereffects of execution by the state (with the help of Amy Seimetz and an adorable Charlie Shotwell).

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